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Full text of "Sandspur, Vol. 30, No. 14, January 11, 1929."

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The Rollins Sandspur 

Published by Students of Rollins College 


Winter Park* Florida, Friday, January 11, 1929 


No. 14 


PRES. HOLT ATTENDS 
COLLEGE CONFERENCE 


ROLLINS CONTINUES TO 
ATTRACT NEW STUDENTS 


VARSITY CAGERS POP 
LID WITH MIAMI TILT 


Volume 31 


ROLLINS DAY BY DAY 


Being all registered, and re-reg¬ 
istered, lets go* But be careful, 
don't study too hard. Curiosity 
killed a cat. 


“The Thundering Herd"—wtu- 
dents on their way to get their 
marks. "The Roar of the Crowd/' 
after they got them. 

Well l Well! Our old friend 
"Lefty" Moore pulled in Sunday all 
set to enter school. “Lefty" will 
join the Sandspur staff and believe 
us folks, he is a “writin' fool," 


The good ship Pani-Pani, flagship 
of the Rollins Yacht Club fleet, is 
undergoing extensive repairs under 
the able direction of Capt. Ells* 
worth Watson Bassett, 


Now that Rollins canoes have been 
officially denuded of all those things 
which formerly made a canoe fasci¬ 
nating, i, e. mattresses and pillowy, 
wc expect the Yacht Club to foster 
a series of “moonlight sails" etc., 
when the weather moderates of 
course. 


It is evident that those who are 
responsible for the banning of these 
comforts in our canoes have never 
been canoeing in the moonlight or 
else have been too often. 


Speaking of marks again, we no¬ 
ticed one fellow with an “incom¬ 
plete" in swimming. We would say 
that swimming is a dangerous sub¬ 
ject as a pastime to said party. It 
suggests to us, “Down went McGinty 
to the Bottom of the Sea. 1 ' 


And would'nt it be awful if one 
of our co-eds made an “incomplete 
while swimming back from a canoe 
ride. 


Freddie Cooke sea: 

“If we could buy ourselves for 
what we are worth and sell ourselves 
for what we think were worth, some¬ 
body would get sadly cheated. 


NO. 1 

The last word in closed cars. 

If all the New Year's resolutions 
were end to end they wouldn t reach 
to February. 


Judging from some of the south¬ 
ern girls seen in action, all the Lap¬ 
landers don't come from the north. 


Little Theatre to Present 
New York Stage Play 


“Icebound' 1 is the title of the play 
written by Owen Davis which won 
the Pulitzer Prize for the best play 
written by an American author dur¬ 
ing the year 1923. 

The play has been received by 
New York theatre goers as one of 
the best that has been on the Amer¬ 
ican stage, and subsequent to its 
New York run it has proven a pop- 
continued on page 4) 


F^esident Hamilton Holt left 
Wednesday for Chattanooga, Tenn., 
where he is attending the 13 th an¬ 
nual meeting of the Association of 
American Colleges and Affiliated 
College Boards of the Congrega¬ 
tional and Presbyterian Churches, 
which is being held Jan. 10-12 at 
the Read House. 

One of the principle subjects for 
debate is, “What Constitutes a Col¬ 
lege Teacher?" Under this heading 
nine new plans of education are be¬ 
ing considered, of w r hieh the “Work¬ 
shop Method of Rollins” is one. 
President Holt is to lead the dis¬ 
cussion with reference to Rollins. 

Other progressive educational sys¬ 
tems being explained are, “The Har¬ 
vard Tutorial System/' by A, I-aw- 
rence Lowell; “Teaching at Prince¬ 
ton/ 1 by Luther P, Fdscnhart; 
“Teaching at the University of Min¬ 
nesota/* by Melvin E, Haggerty; 
by Arthur E, Morgan; “How Wc 
Teach at Rccd College/* by Nor¬ 
man F. Coleman ; “Teaching Hohot 
Students at Svvarthmore/ 1 by Ray¬ 
mond Walters; “How We Teach at 
Whittier/' by Joseph Herschel Cof¬ 
fin; and “The Independent Study 
Plan of Stanford University/ 1 by 
Edgar E. Robinson. 

Dr. Holt will deliver a formal ad¬ 
dress before the College Board of 
Presbyterian Churches and is also 
taking part in the conference of the 
Churches. 

World Peace Emblem 

Shown Here in Chapel 

An interesting flag was shown at 
chapel last Friday by Rev, J. W. 
Van Kirk, representing the World 
Peace Emblem which has been ac¬ 
cepted by the Twentieth Interna¬ 
tional Peace Conference at The 
Hague 1913, and has since been 
raised at many international, polit¬ 
ical meetings of importance. 

In introducing the speaker, Pres. 
Holt referred to him in highest 
terms as the man who is carrying 
the message of peace and good will 
around the world, without the back¬ 
ing of any church or organization, 
delivering his talks without charge. 
Since Dr. Holt felt sure everyone 
present stood for the peace move¬ 
ment, he requested the Rev. Van 
Kirk not to dwell on that subject, 
hut to tell of his experiences and 
activities. 

The speaker stated that after be¬ 
ing pastor of Grace M. E. Church, 
Youngstown, Ohio, and building a 
beautiful edifice there, he w as grant¬ 
ed a leave of absence. 

He w r ent on a tour around the 
world, proclaiming the message of 
peace to many peoples. Since 1920 
he has spoken approximately at 
2*200 high schools, colleges and uni¬ 
versities, 800 churches and clubs. 

As brotherhood grew to be a 
world wide idea, he wrote a compli¬ 
ment to our declaration of independ¬ 
ence, proclaiming the principles of 
(Continued on page 4) 


Again demonstrating the lure of 
the conference plan and our effic¬ 
ient facility, 17 additional students 
have entered Rollins with the open¬ 
ing of the winter term. This num-^ 
her includes nine who have trans¬ 
ferred from other colleges and five 
new' freshmen. Among the now col¬ 
leges represented on the campus are 
the University of Chicago, Ohio 
State University and Western State 
Teachers college. 

The list of new students with the 
places from which they come fol¬ 
low. 

New freshmen; Frank J. Cowan, 
Lakewood, Ohio; Isabelle Hill, Chi¬ 
cago, III.; Mary Lee Korns, Glean, 
N. Y,; Norman Lombard, Jr,, Sound 
Beach, Conn.; Helen C* Voorhees, 
Dade City, Fla. 

Freshman transfers: Helen Bak¬ 
er, University of Chicago; Ella Mac 
Weeks, Rice Institute, Houston, 
Texas; B, M. Walpole, Jr., Citadel. 

Sophomores: Janet M. R. Cad- 
man, Florida State College for Wo¬ 
men; Isabelle Hough, University of 
Chicago; James M. Sheldon, Jr., 
University of Chicago; Hardy A. 
Sullivan, University of North Caro¬ 
lina. 

Juniors: Eleanor Bode, Ohio 

State university ; Ruth E. Ellsworth, 
Josephine Jentes, Ohio State univer¬ 
sity. 

Old students will he very happy 
to learn that “Lefty" Moore, star 
athlete, is hack with us again. Lefty 
was not able to return for the first 
term because of old football injuries 
which were troubling him. 

Miss Christy Loring Mae Kaye 
daughter of Percy Mac Kaye, has 
registered as a special student. 

Miss Alice Kretzinger has changed 
from a special to a regular student. 

Major Putnam Gives 
Tuesday Evening Lecture 

Major George Haven Putnam, 
noted publisher, author, soldier, and 
preacher, addressed a capacity au¬ 
dience at the Congregational Church 
Tuesd ay evening, J a n u ary 8. M a j or 
Putnam who has long been an im¬ 
portant link between England and 
America, spoke on “Relations Be¬ 
tween England and America." 

The talk opened with a review 
of the meeting in England to cele¬ 
brate ainical relations between her 
and her sister across the sea. At 
this meeting, Major Putnam who 
spoke in behalf of America, created 
a “Declaration of Interdependence" 
to express the new relation between 
the countries. Thus the meeting 
came to be known as the “Meeting 
of Interdependence." 

The Major summarized the ne¬ 
cessity for cooperation between Eng¬ 
land and America and, in fact, be¬ 
tween all English-speaking peoples. 

“The literary interests of Eng¬ 
lish-speaking peoples is the same. 
Books are an important connecting 
link between sympathetic readers. 

“The World War proved to the 
(Continued on page 4) 


Hopes for a victory over the Hur¬ 
ricanes of Miami “U" were bolstered 
by the reappearance of Captain Zoi- 
Icr, Buddy Goodell and Dave 
Schnuck, These men have been on 
the hospital list since their return 
from the pre-season trip through the 
state, but are putting out some great 
work since their return to the court. 

Coach Jim Bailey has developed 
his charges into a smooth working 
team that has shown both offensive 
and defensive power. 

The game Saturday will he the 
first college game of the year and 
the boys arc determined to make it 
a win. 

Advance reports are to the effect 
that the Miami team is a strong one 
and that they are hard at work pre¬ 
paring for the Tars, 

The team leaves for the southern 
city early Saturday morning. 

The Conservatory of Music will 
present the program for the Tues¬ 
day Evening Lecture Course on the 
evening of January 15th at 8 o'clock 
in the Congregational Church. 

This program will consist of a 
variety of music and it is hoped that 
all students will avail themselves of 
this opportunity to again hear the 
Conservatory in Concert. 


FLU 


If one believes the old adage “An 
ounce of prevention is worth a pound 
of care," now is the time to apply 
it with flu in the air. 

A number of students have been 
late in returning from sieges of it 
and others are suffering with it now. 

Those who have the illness should 
report to Dr. Burks at once for care. 
Further, the patient should not hes¬ 
itate to protect himself and his class¬ 
mates by adherence to the good ad¬ 
vice of sleep and seclusion. 

The prevalent cases are a very 
mild type of flu, the symptoms be¬ 
ing: coughing, headaches, backache, 
sore joints and burning of the eyes. 
Students having any of these owe 
themselves and classmates the duty 
of reporting for medical attention. 

General rules for precautiony 
measures to avoid contagion are hard 
to define but two good ones are: do 
not mingle in crowds any more or 
any longer than necessary ; and keep 
yourself in as fit a physical condi¬ 
tion as possible. 


WHAT’S GOING ON 


Saturday, January 12 
Tars vs. Hurricane Hoopsters, in 
Miami. 

Gamma Phi Beta Benefit Bridge. 

3 o'clock at Woman's Club. 

Sunday, January 13 
Symphony Orchestra Concert. 

4 o'clock at Recreation Hall. 

Tuesday, January 15 
Lecture. 

8:15 P. M. at Congregational church. 

Wednesday, January 16 
Dr. Harry W. Lai die r. 

7:45 F. M,, at Knowles Hall. 


















































Two 


THE ROLLINS SANDSPUR 


3[Ije §>an&apur 


Established in irb* with the following edl 
torial: '‘Unassuming yet mighty* sharp and 
pointed* well-rounded yet many-sided, aasidU' 
ously tenacious yet as gritty and energetic 
ns its name Implies, vlctorlou* in ■ingle com¬ 
bat and therefore without a peer* wonderfully 
attractive and extensive In circulation; all 
these will be found upon Investigation to be 
among the extraordinary qualities of The 
Swidspur/ 1 


accidents occuring on the high seas 
is quite different and convincing* 
The next meeting of the club will 
be held some time this week. At 
this time the officers will be an¬ 
nounced * 


SCRUB CLUB MEETS 

GEORGE HAVEN PUTNAM 


STAFF 

Aurora McKay ___ Editor 

Asa Jjsnninuh.. Associate Editor 

Alfred Rashid Associate Editor 

Stella Weston Society Editor 

R i c ha ii d B uck M abte it Conservatory 
Donald McIntosh Business Mgr. 
Gordon Rodins Advertising Mgr. 

Wilfred Rice .Circulation Mgr . 

Special Writers i 

Ernest Zollkr, Frank Abbott, 
Elsie Braun - , Edward Trimmier 
John Sinclair 


DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

The student* in the Department of 
tin Ham will co-operate with the Staff. 

Jour- 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

i j pi* Year 

irv.nn 

Sinirlr f’nnv 

in 


Entered as second-class matter Nov* 
ID23. n t the Postoffice at Winter Park, 
Via. tinder Hie Act of March Srd. lR7fi 

24 th, 
Flor- 

Member Florida Collegiate Press Association. 
Member South Florida Pres* Association. 
Member National Editorial Association. 


We of the Sands pur take this op¬ 
portunity to congratulate you of the 
Flamingo, Rollins literary magazine, 
on a very successful first issue* 


It is interesting to note that along 
with the Paris Peace Pact, a bill for 
the building of fifteen battle cruisers 
will be introduced at Congress. 


HOLLINS YACHT CLUB 


The first meeting of the Rollins 
Yacht Club was held on December 
20th. Not having the yacht with 
which to start the dub it was unan¬ 
imously voted to procure a tub of 
some sort* The ideal boat was dis¬ 
covered up to its neck in chameleons 
and water on the south-east side of 
Lake Virginia. Being much too bul¬ 
ky for stealing, it was thought best 
to try to buy the good ship* 

On December 22nd the good ship 
"Vestris” was paddled and bailed to 
the shore behind the Gym* Here it 
received a scraping and painting that 
was indeed noble. Except for sever¬ 
al yards of sail that were missing, 
the boat was found to be in excellent 
condition* It was a most pleasant 
surprise to find that the brig floated 
right side up most of the time* 

The great blow came on the 27th 
when it was found that the name had 
been left off. This was remedied 
with a soap box perch for the painter 
and a can of black paint* The Com¬ 
modore has become terribly pro¬ 
ficient in catching and murdering all 
stray zephyrs. The crew seldom, if 
ever, fall in the lake. Two cases of 
near drowning have taught the deck 
hands to play that they are sails and 
stick close to the stays* Second Mate 
Harris gives some neat exhibitions of 
dodging the boom andKaki Cooke can 
do double cart wheels on the bow¬ 
sprit unaided* 

Abbott and Abbot, maritime law¬ 
yers* are taking charge of all legal 
matters for the club. The life insur¬ 
ance offered by said company for all 


Major George Haven Putnam, of 
the G. P; Putnam and Sons Publish¬ 
ing Company, was the guest of honor 
at the meeting of the Scrub Club and 
their friends which was held at the 
home of Dr. Holt Sunday evening 
December 6. 

The Major entertained the gather¬ 
ing by recounting his experiences 
here and abroad* Many of these 
tales took place at the time of the 
Civil War and of the World War* 

At the conclusion of his talk, the 
Major answered various questions 
put to him by the members of the 
Scrub Club* At this time, by re¬ 
quest, the Major gave a vivid des¬ 
cription of Abraham Lincoln who 
he met at the latter's Cooper-Union 
Speech in New York City. 

Among the other guests of the 
Scrub Club Sunday evening were: 
■Judge George C* Holt, the Misses 
Holt, Mrs* Hamilton Holt and her 
sister, Mrs. Mary Smith, Fred Chase 
Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Bingham, 
Clementine Hall, Asa Jennings, 
Polka James, Richard Hayward, 
Mary Lee Korns and Philip Cunv 
mings. 


First Inebriate: Shay! Notish 
how zhish floor's moving around ? 

Second: Yeh* Mush be made of 
flagstonesh. 



The Owl Book 
Shop 

and Circulating Library 

10 Murphy Arcade 
Orlando 



Washburn’s 
Luncheon—Afternoon Tea—Dinner 

Phone 3636 

16 W. Washington St,, Orlando 


HAGAR 

CUSTOM TAILOR 

j: 35 Cast Church St. Orlando, Fla* 

so:::?*:::::;:::::::::::: is::::: ::::::: 


Rhoad’s Hat 
Shop 

OFFERING - - 

A new and most exclusive 
line of millinery* 

“FINEST HATS AT THE FAIREST 
PRICES 1 r 

14 5. Main St* Phone 4413 
ORLANDO 


i 

i 

\ 


HOEFLER’S 

Cafeteria and 
Dining Room 


Any Service Desired — Food Always the Best f 

POPULAR PRICES j 

San Juan Hotel Building j 

17-26 West Centra! :: :: Orlando, Florida i 

Munir by (JuitniAii'ti Trio Bach Evt-ninfi 6-7*30 j 



Would you 
wear an apron to a 
"The Dansant”? 

The thought is amusing, horrify¬ 
ing, laughable or ludicrous, yet 
it is an apt analogy for what is 
thoughtlessly £oing on in the fine 
old art of writing letters. People 
are writing letters of high social 
importance on eheap t common¬ 
place paper; letters of business 
import on folded sheets of various 
hues* We are offering especially 
attractive and appropriate selec¬ 
tions of modern writing paper, 
auggesting the three kinds that 
etiquette demands should he in 
every home: Crane's for the very 
best; Eaton’s Highland Linen for 
everyday correspondence; Eaton’s 
Deckle vellum, a flat sheet for 
the man* Come to us for the latest 
and the best. 

THE ROLLINS PRESS 

FINE STATIONERY 

WINTER PARK - - FLORIDA 



SLATER-SCOTT 

GOWNS WRAPS 
SPORT CLOTHES 


SAN JUAN HOTEL 

20 N. Orange Ave. Orlando* Florida 




Mrs. Mabel M. Hobbins 


announces the opening of 


The Vogue Shoft 


with an extensive line of 


correct millinery 


number 9 and 11 Autrey Arcade 


Gage Hats 


Orlando, Florida 




" * 








































































THE ROLLINS SANDSPUR 


Three 



W. A . A, NOTES 


Hockey, the major winter sport, 
is now being played on Tuesdays 
and Fridays at the Harper-Sheperd 
field. Announcements of Odd-Even 
games will be given later. 

The basketball championship wii s 
successfully won by the Evens for 
the second season. 


All girls who waited too long to 
join W. A. A., last term start work¬ 
ing now' for membership. 


K. E. ROMMENTS 


Kappa Epsilon takes great pleas¬ 
ure in announcing Mrs, Katherine 
Holland Brown as honorary member. 

Becky Caldwell, who is teaching 
in the Phillippines now, sent some 
red and white Japanese pins to our 
pledges. Becky sends us some inter¬ 
esting snapsliots of her tw T o year tour 
in the Orient. 

Mat has returned to the house at 
last after keeping us in suspense a 
while, 

Tuesday afternoon we enjoyed a 
visit around our fireplace with Miss 
Sylvia and Miss Constance Holt 

Betty Bath bone made a late ap¬ 
pearance on the campus when she re¬ 
turned Sunday from spending her 
Christmas ill Massachusetts. 

We rejoice that both Mrs, (Ster¬ 
ling and Mrs. Powers are recover¬ 
ing rapidly from recent illnesses. 

Miss Overton, of Miami, stopped 
to visit us on her way to Brcnan 
College, Gainesville, Georgia, 

Pot’s vacation is entirely ended. 
She is back at her old post of chief 
fir cm aker. 


SIGMA PHI 


We of Sigma Pin sorority are 
mourning the loss of our beloved 
honorary member, Mrs, J, Dudley 
Calhoun, who suddenly passed away 
of heart failure at her home in New 
Rochelle, N. Y., on Thursday, Jan¬ 
uary third, 

Mrs, Calhoun had endeared her¬ 
self to us by her generosity, her in¬ 
timate interest in all our affairs, and 
by her wise and friendly advice on 
all occasions, Words cannot express 
our deep sense of loss. 


GAMMA PHI BETA 


The Gamma Phi Beta winter Irene- 
fit bridge will be given at the Wo¬ 
man’s Club on Saturday afternoon, 
January 12 from 3:00 to 0:00. Fac¬ 
ulty and students are cordially in¬ 
vited, Reservations may be made 
with Helen Morrow' or Louise Shinn. 

Alpha Mu of Gamma Phi Beta 
wishes to announce the Misses Ade¬ 
line and Caroline Wing of Bangor, 
Maine, as patronesses. 

Estelle Pipkorn returned from 
Sarasota Sunday night. Van Dame 
came up with Glad Morton on the 
train. 

Krause joined the ranks of flu vic¬ 
tims last week. She s back now. 

Chapman, Sehanck, Pope and 
Murph went pump hunting with the 
Commodore and Second Mato ot the 


Yacht Club Sunday afternoon. The 
season would have been quite suc¬ 
cessful if the bolts hadn’t been froz 
en tight. 

We’ve about come to the conclu¬ 
sion that Ginny should have left 
“Pinky* 1 animal in New York. 


ALPHA OMEGA ANTICS 


Boh Daly and Mary Veasey re¬ 
turned Sunday from their homes in | 
Wisconsin and Oklahoma where they I 
spent the holidays. They are the 
last to return to the fold. 

Kitty spent Sunday in St. Cloud, 

Jerry Laurence is in Howey and 
we are looking forward to a visit 
from her in the near future. Good 
ole* Jerry! It sure will seem good 
to see her again, 

Patsy is now a gal lorn ping big dog, 
to use Ginnie's expression, 

A few of the Alpha Omega girls 
were mistaken for country lassies, 
when they left Wilson's camp to at¬ 
tend the New Year’s Eve movies in 
Winter Garden. However, they en¬ 
joyed the experience. 

CLO V EH LEA F CA USER IE 

Clover leaf held out friendly arms 
to welcome scores of girls returning 
from the ardors of the Christmas 
holidays. 

Not only does it safely enfold the 
old girls once more, but it also shel 
ters the new arrivals: Misses Ella 
Mae Weeks, Mary Lee Korns, Helen 
Voorhees* Ruth Ellsworth, Isabel 
Hough, Helen Baker, Isobel Hill, 
Precious Whisk Whitefoot. 1 he last 
named young lady is an exchange 
student from New York City. She 
has been studying at the University 
for Select Alley Felines and will be 
quite an addition to our numbers. 
Everybody is cordially invited to call 
and make her acquaint a nee. She 
may be found with her room-mate, 
Virginia Ralston, or asleep in al¬ 
most anybody's lap. 

For a few days it looked as though 
Cl overleaf would become a hospital. , 
That danger lias been averted, how¬ 
ever, as Helen Porter, Doris Stone, 
and Alice Burdett have tired of 
chewing on Dr, Burk's thermometer 
and have risen from their beds of 
pain. 

Our adored Miss Hughes is back 
in her accustomed place and we are 
mighty glad to see her there, 

Wc feel that it is our duty to warn 
you to look in your beds before re¬ 
tiring. Stella Lane has imported a 
baby ’gator from Tampa. She says 
that sleeping in strange beds is his 
weakness now'. So beware! 

Both our Billies have deserted us, 
B. Eiske has moved to her parental 
roof, while B, Chapman now' hangs 
her hat at the Gamma Phi Beta house 
Another case of “gone but not for¬ 
gotten.’ 


LAKESIDE RIPPLES 


We are very much pleased to have 
four new residents in Lakeside. 
Eleanor Bode of Columbus, Ohio and 
her room-mate J. J entice of Dover- 
ville, Ohio are Delta Gammas from 
Ohio State, 

Miss Rannie Baker of Indianapo¬ 
lis is working for a Master’s degree 


in teaching. Miss Betty Lockwood 
from New T Britain, Connecticut is 
also living in Lakeside. She is Mr. 
Hanna’s assistant in the office. 

Miss Helen Bingham, of Man¬ 
chester, New Hampshire, arrived 
Wednesday to spend two weeks with 
Mr, and Mrs. Bingham. 

We arc very sorry that Mr. Bing¬ 
ham lias been ill with a cold for sev¬ 
eral days. 

Jane Folsom has been ill for a cou¬ 
ple of days* We hope that she will 
be up and around with the merry 
throng soon. 

Courses of sophistication are being 
given in Professor Doggett’s room 
every Monday night, 

George Orr is our star caller. We 
like to have you George but you 
know dark corridors arc dangerous. 
Sunny Hazard visited Frances 
Poggett Monday night, 

Sarah K. Huev and Thelma Ca- 
wood played in the Symphony in 
Orlando Sunday afternoon, Monday 
and Tuesday night. 

It seems great to have everybody 
back again and according to all re¬ 
ports we all made “whoopee” during 
Christmas vacation. 


CHASE HALL NOTES 


Christmas is long past, yet the 
market in neckties is still depressed. 
Good cigarette lighters are quoted 
at two Christmas ties each, la vendor 
and yellow ones excepted. 

Howard Rosse now drives a car, 
but hints that anyone with an extra 
pair of good shoes might have an op- 

EL CORTEZ Apartments, completely 
furnished, heated, three-room apart¬ 
ments, private garages, attractive 
loca’ion, block from post office and 
Orlando bus Rents reduced from 
$fifl to $■%, 208 Morse Boulevard, 

Winter Park, 


FORST’S 

EXQUISITE SHOES 

25-29 South Orange Avenue 
OR I. ANDO 


Eye* Examined Glasses Fitted 

SMfT H 

Optometrist G00n Better marks 

5 East Pine Street Orlando, Florida 


port unity for an advantageous trade. 
The benzine chariot of Gee, Mc- 
Kereher and Co,, seems to have 
coughed its last gasp. Louis Benton 
thinks the trouble is from using too 
much tangerine juice for gasoline. 

Of course we all think Cross is an 
excellent bugler, but we miss the lit¬ 
tle personal touch in the morning. 
MeCallum always opens each door 
and plays reveille until caught in the 
head with a boot. 

Rollins A n t h v m 
Greetings to our students 
From almost every section 
May we all freeze together 
In brotherly nflFffeetion, 

The above is an ode inspired by a 
cake of ice found in the wash-bowl 
on Monday morning. 


ROLLINS SPECIAL 

THE MOST 

Delicious Double-Decker 

SANDWICH 


You’ll Like It _ 

College Coffee Shop and Grill j 

103 N. Orange Ave., Orlando 


Swastika Sweet Shop 

HAMILTON HOTEL 


i 


Home-made Candies and Conserves j 
Crystalized Fruits Salted Nuts j 


ORDERS F ILL E D FOR 

j SANDWICHES 


WINTER PARK 
CLOTHING AND 
DRY GOODS STORE 


PULL LINE OF MEN’S. 
WOMEN’S & CHILDREN'S 
) WEARING APPAREL 

| 352 East Park Avc, 


!' 


The Wise Student Knows 

What to eat and where to 
enjoy it 



Treat Yourself to 
the Best at 

The 


ALWAYS 

OPEN 


Varsity Woffle Shop 

An Institution for the College 

Catering to those of 
Discriminating Taste 


145 WEST FAIRBANKS A VENUE 


DANCING 


WINTER PARK 
FLORIDA 


DANCING 






















































































Four 


THE ROLLINS SANDSPUR 



*1 was out with « fraternity man 
last night and he had the largest 
pin I've ever seen/' 

"That wasn’t no fraternity man, 
TIi at was a policeman/' 

— Wet Hen, 


If a man makes a mistake in 
choosing a wife these days it certain¬ 
ly his own fault. He can see all 
he’s getting, 

—Blue Oat or* 


Frosh; You must have made a 
mistake in giving me an F on this 
paper. 

Prof; Young man, 1 very seldom 
make mistakes. Have you seen my 
secretary ? 

Fresh; Oh, boy, have I! I guess 
you’re right. 

M. / 7\ Van Dm 


Owner of Colliteh Kar on Witness 
Stand; And then tlie truck bumped 
the fender on my ear. 

Attorney: Which fender? 
Witness; THE fender. 

— Wisconsin Octopus . 


Tourist, Second Class 
Steward: Is there anything I can 
get for you, sir? 

Half Overboard: Yes, I'd like a 
smalt island, please. 

— Ames Green Gander, 


Boy: "What size shoe do you 
wear ?" 

Girl: "Well, four is my size, but 
I wear sevens because fours hurt my 
feet so," 


Instead of God protecting the 
working girl, the police should pro¬ 
tect the men they work. 


"Oh-h-h! Purcell, vot you tink? I 
was arrested for speefing today/ 1 
"Vot! you haf no cat, haf you?" 
"O, not that. Speetlng on the 
sidewalk," 


They say that a single oyster will 
lay from one to eight million eggs a 
year. 

Gosh ! Think of the married ones. 


Lady {to druggist): "Have you 
any Life Buoy?** 

Druggist: "Just set the pace, 
lady/' 


Natural History 

Teacher: Hast us, what animat is 
most noted for its fur? 

Kastus: Dr skunk; dt: more fur 
you gits away from him dc better it 
Is fur you, 

— Goblin, 

We could tell you some more 
jokes, hut what's the use? You 
would only laugh at them, 

—Northwestern Purple Parrot . 


He; "Could l have a date to- 
night?” 

She: "Yes, if you could find any 
one dumb enough to date you. 

He: "Well, I'll be around to sec 
you about eight o'clock then/' 


Cynic: Bridge has one thing in 
its favor. 

Sceptic: Yeah ? 

Cynic: It enables one to enjoy , 

oneself with bores. 


LITTLE THEATRE TO 
PRESENT N E W 

YORK STAGE PLAY 


lie: "My dear, I regret to have 
to tell you I am bankrupt." 

She: "Oh, help! Then I married 
for love after all." 


(Continued from page 1) 
ular favorite with Little Theatre 
groups, 

"Icebound'' is the first play on the 
winter program of the Rollins Little 
Theatre Workshop, to be given on 
the evening of January :j]. Its 
three acts furnish a steady run of 
action which leads to a most delight¬ 
ful ending. 


MAJOR PUTNAM GIVES 

TVES . EVENING LECTURE 


"You mean to tell me dat your 
mutter schims in der vater and 
pushes der boat along?" 

"Choor—she is my out-board 
mutter." 


Her’n: Isn’t it terribly hard to 
be a proof reader? 

Hia'n: Why, no, it’s simply a 
case of following the arrow. 


Soph: "What's that hole doing 
there in your trousers , H " 

Frosh: "Showing my underwear 
I guess. Why?" 


Teacher: "Do von know who the 
Black Prince was?” 

Willie: "Yes sir; the son of 
1 Old King Cole/' 


"Have you ever heard of Atlantic 
City?" 

"That’s where they have the great 
board walk, is it not?" 


Dean (to Frosh) : "Do you know 
who I am?" 

Frosh: "No, but if you remem¬ 
ber your address I'll take you home. 


‘■Yep. After you pay your hoard f. Drunk; Lookat that sign . 


you have to walk. 


He: "I wish you could make the 
bread your mother used to make/' 
She: "I wish you could make the 
dough your father used to make." 


He worked in a marble quarry 
and took a whole lot for granite. 


Visitor: I say old chap, you will 
be relieved to know that it w T asn't 
mushrooms that made you ill at our 
place the other night—they w r cre 
toad-stools. 


Drunker: Whnzzit shay? 

Drunk: Shays ladies ready to 
wear clothes. 

Drunker; Well, ish about time, 
ain't it? 

—Den iron FI a mingo . 


(Continued from page 1) 
English that wo Americans could 
fight. It also brought the realisa¬ 
tion that Finglish-spcaking people 
have things to do together. 

"Now the major task of America 
is to join her kinsfolk in the League 
of Nations. As a civilized country 
she must do her part in maintaining 
the only organization for peace and 
justice." 

OUR ADVERTISERS HELP UR 
LET’S HELP THEM 


JANUA R Y SUIT SALE 
Jan. 12 th to 19th 

SUITS, TOPCOATS. 
SWEATERS, HATS 

See our windows 

BAKER’S 

at the corner r downtown ” 




Peerless Kettle-Popped Corn 

Toasted Peanuts 

Now England and E. Park Avei. 


SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS 

THE QUALITY SHOPPE 

Special Price* on Handkerchiefs 
and Necktie* 

Large assortment of Gifts, Towel Sets 
and Luncheon Sett* 

The Stare Where Youf Dollar* Hnv* Mara Cants 


Stop with us—you will be pleased 

PITTSBURGH HOUSE 

Clean Beds and Good Meals 

RATES REASONABLE 

Mrs. J. A. Gamble, Mgr. Winter Park 


I 


SEE US FOR SERVICE 


at D1CKSON-1VES CO. | Joh " s “ n ’i“ er . Shop 


ORANGE AVE„ ORLANDO 


The Very New 
Printed Shoes 
<jjg.50 pair 

Silk Crepe Slippers, light colors, 
printed in modernistic patterns, 
exceedingly good looking! 

$8,50 Pair 

SECOND FLOOR 


328 East Park Ave. 

A FRIEND OF THE COLLEGE MEN ’’ 


WOULD PEACE EMBLEM 

SHOWN HERE IN CHAPEL 


(Continued from page 1) 
a common humanity, and to call the 
world to interdepednenee and broth¬ 
erhood, This document was rend at 
Independence Square, in Phil add 
phia, and has been accepted by 
many organizations. Toward the 
close of the meeting the flag was un¬ 
furled and exhibited. It was dark 
blue silk with 4l> silver stars, with a 
square at the left of the colors of the 
rainbow in consecutive stripes which 
merge into a white band encircling 
the globe, at the right of the flag. 

The Rev. Van Kirk is now on his 
third tour around the world in a 
Ford auto which he intends to pre¬ 
sent to Henry Ford after his return. 


OUR ADVERTISERS HELP US 
LET’S HELP THEM 


r 


Coats, Dresses, Suits 

MADE TO ORDER 

GUARANTEED 
PERFECT FIT 

Lowest Prices in Town 

DeLong, Tailor 

244 East Park Ave. f 

Altering Cleaning Pressing | 


THE BEST SHOE REPAIRING 

in the Stale—right here in Winter t’afk 
REASONABLE CHARGES 

WINTER PARK SHOE HOSPITAL 


Back af Baker'* 

::ii:rriiiitt:!ii:::;::::::: 


NOW OPEN-HOTEL WINTER PARK 

A cool, modern, home-like Hotel. 
Offers attractive rates to regular 
gueata. Special consideration to 
Rollins atudentN. Dining room in 
connection. Part Areaae and Canton 


**Hest coffee in town * r 

LUNCHES 

DOWNYFLAKE DOUGHNUT 
SHOPPE 

9 East Pint St. Orlando 

Phone 6454 


DR. L. E. MOORE I 

DENTIST 

Corner Church and Orange ji 
Phone 9671 ORLANDO j; 


Shoes Repaired 

White You Wait 


I 


HANSON’S j 

ELECTRIC 
SHOE REPAIRING 


27 East Pine Street, Orlando 





j CITY STORAGE GARAGE ! 

t ! Special Rates to Students 


\ ! 


= ! 


I j Kelly Tires Accessories Washing and Polishing 
j Cars called for and delivered Repairs on all makes 




J 


i 

I <*M 


151 Welborne Avenue 


Phone 74 


Winter Park 


j